A Look at What’s New at Big Mountain Data

In case you’re not subscribed to our newsletter (and you should be!), here is what we’ve been up to lately at Big Mountain Data:

1. Collaborative Project with Wunderman Health.

In May, at the inaugural American Society of Evidence-based Policing conference in Phoenix, #ASEBPconf2017, we announced a new venture with Wunderman Health in NYC. Together, we are collaborating on an educational web site that curates innovation examples around the U.S. focused on Violence Against Women solutions. The site will be parked at the URL: ViolenceAgainstWomen.sucks.

The URL says it all, and, frankly, it’s all you need to say about the everyday reality of violence against women. Our goal is to showcase what is working.

Oftentimes, law enforcement, nonprofits, and civic agencies stumble upon something interesting by attending a conference, or reading a media report. We want to accelerate that exposure and learning. We are asking progressive law enforcement agencies to share their stories, so that we can amplify them via this site and social media.

If you want to learn more about how you can get involved, or how to submit your cases, please let us know. We are pitching this idea to backers, and are optimistic about our prospects to make this showcase a reality.

Wunderman Health is a New York City-based global digital agency and a world leader in marketing and database operations.  The Wunderman Health team, led by CEO Becky Chidester, has partnered with us on the site design and launch plan.

 

2. First Steps in Nashville.

At our partner Superion’s flagship customer event, #SUGA17, we launched our MVP (minimum viable product) for the law enforcement market. The IPVO Tracker will create an offender list, as well as training staff on how to properly collect data on offenders and teach staff on how intimate partner violence is uniquely different from other types of criminal behavior.

Analysis of the data is the first step in the highly successful High Point Model.  If you’re interested in learning more, let us know.  First-time pilot customers can sign up now for a 20% early adopter discount.

 

 

 

3. Our “Dream Product.” 

With the expertise of Dr. Jill Messing, a leading academic and thought leader on Lethality Assessment, we are creating a new software tool in order to assess the threat risk of domestic violence offenders. The software will be able to combine criminal history with lethality factors and compute a unique score for each offender.

The software will be SaaS-based and accessible via any mobile or desktop device, including patrol car systems. Criminal justice, law enforcement, and social services professionals will have real-time data available on all known offenders.

 

 

 

4. Capstone Kick-off.

Big Mountain Data is now a board member of the  Master of Data Analytics (MSDA) program at University of Central Florida.  We will be partnering with Brevard County Sheriff’s Office to build a tool that will identify, track, and hold offenders accountable. The project will be a capstone assignment for MSDA students who will graduate in the spring of 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

5. New Services Listed on Web Site. 

 

We have a number of new services on our website, including our co-venture with Superion.

We’re primarily interested in providing law enforcement with clean data on dangerous, repeat offenders.  But, we’ll also do data analysis local to your region.  We’ve worked with universities, journalists, nonprofits, and researchers to supply data visualizations and reports.

If you have a custom report or project in mind that involves data analysis, we can turnaround projects fairly quickly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Moving Forward

August is approaching fast and will bring with it the Tech2Empower conference in Austin, TX. The statewide conference will provide an exclusive peek into leading technology that will help “build community, strengthen services, and tell the story of the Texas family violence movement.”

Below is a description of our workshop.  We’ll also be exhibiting at the event, showcasing our software prototype, and answering questions about our data analysis offering.

We are looking forward to returning to our Austin roots!

Big Mountain Data heads to Nashville

We are joining our partner, Superion, in Nashville, TN this month to host a screening of our film preview and  to discuss the ways data can inform the criminal justice ecosystem surrounding the intimate partner violence challenge.  If you’re a Superion customer going to SUGA 2017, we look forward to seeing you there.  Our film preview will be in Hermitage C at 2:15pm on June 20.  We will feature our film team, as well as host a conversation with Chief Ken Shultz of the High Point Police and Shay Harger, victim services director at Family Services of the Piedmont.

Just like Politics, All Domestic Violence is Local

From L: David Barden, Attorney; Jim Verity, Former Orange Co. Sheriff Law Enforcement Officer; Carol Wick, Domestic Violence Expert; Dr. Lee Ross, UCF Assoc. Professor of Criminal Justice; Tom Gabor, Criminologist Christy Jordan, Mental Health Counselor.

Big Mountain Data was pleased to produce a local learning event for the League of Women Voters here in Seminole County.  The topic was, “Guns and Domestic Violence: a Deadly Combination.”  The event ran two hours and featured noted gun violence scholar, Dr. Thomas Gabor, as well as an expert panel including voices from law enforcement, victim services, and academia.  Nearly 100 Seminole County residents attended the two-hour event.

Key takeaways included a better understanding of how the danger increases exponentially when a domestic violence offender has access to a firearm, the gaps in the existing process regarding the surrender of firearms, how “murder-suicide” in the headlines is nearly always a euphemism for domestic violence homicide, and the role the community can play in increasing pressure on local leadership to identify and safeguard the population from dangerous, high-risk offenders.

“We need to focus on the volatility of the perpetrator rather than the vulnerability of the victim.” – Carol Wick, domestic violence expert.

Private Violence: Three Years Later

This post is cross-posted from the Private Violence team email.  It’s authored by our longtime advisor, Kit Gruelle. 

Kit Gruelle in the film “Private Violence.”

In January 2014, Private Violence premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Many people who watched the film were stunned and appalled by what they saw on the screen: Deanna Walters, rescued after her estranged husband kidnapped and terrorized her from one end of the country to the other, lying like a corpse in her hospital bed, every inch of her bruised and battered. Viewers were equally appalled by how little regard North Carolina’s criminal justice system had for prosecuting Deanna’s near-death assault. Deanna, it turns out, was lucky: her abuser was ultimately brought to justice in federal court and sentenced to 21 years in prison.

For the last three years, I have traveled throughout the country with the film, including spending a great deal of time in the South, both in small towns and big cities. After the credits roll and the lights come up, a Q&A session usually follows. The general feeling in the room is one of outrage. Again and again, people ask, “How can this be happening now in the United States? Aren’t we more evolved than this?” Sadly, the answer to that question is a definitive no. No, we are not more evolved than this. This sort of violence is a too-oft occurrence in homes all across this country.

At screenings, after the Q&A session ends, a line forms. People want to share their personal experiences. Many approach with tears in their eyes. Even more talk about how afraid they are to “say it out loud.” Too many are afraid to call the police. Some have lost loved ones to what we still call “domestic violence,” but what should be called “intimate or misogynistic terrorism.”

The stories are cut from the same cloth. I hear the same narratives, on repeat. Over and over, women say, “He seemed like such a nice guy when we first got together! The nicest guy I ever met!” They wonder what they missed, and often, they blame themselves for the abuse. They take their cue from larger society, and also, our criminal justice system. With deep, lasting, devastating consequences.

It is our addiction to victim-blaming that allows the abuser to carry on, almost completely unchecked, until there’s one or more dead bodies on the ground, and way too many children left to live with the legacy of family-based terrorism that alters their world view forever. I tell people that the abuser commits the act, but the system drives the getaway car for him. And we all pay for it in spades.

What will it take for this country that gives so much lip service to caring about women and children to actually start caring about them? When will we connect the dots between the abuse and violence that is used to control, coerce, and intimidate family members and the criminal conduct we read and hear about in our communities?

I wish I could say that the issues presented in Private Violence have been addressed and rectified, but they have not. Not by a long shot. The (reported) numbers remain the same: One in three women in the U.S. will experience intimate partner terrorism at the hands of their husband or boyfriend. Many abused women who attempt to leave their abusers will be hunted down and murdered in cold blood. Domestic violence murder/suicides are on the rise. Firearms are the weapon of choice. Over 50% of mass shootings have some connection to domestic violence. These are the hard truths, no matter how hard we try to turn away. It is now 2017, and a new administration is in place. And despite these dismal numbers, there is talk about doing away with the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), a bipartisan law that was passed in 1994. It seems that it’s now open season on women and children in the United States.

In the three years since our Sundance premiere, Deanna has graduated from college and is ready to move on to the next phase of her life. But most importantly, she is safe. Living a life free of violence. But thousands upon thousands of Deannas wake up every day in the most dangerous place in the world for them: their very own homes. How is that acceptable in a so-called “free society?” It isn’t, and sadly, Private Violence remains as relevant today as it did at our premiere, and as relevant as it was 10 years ago when we started this project. If VAWA is done away with, it will send an even louder signal to abused and terrorized women and children that what’s happening to them is just fine with the government. In my mind, I can see the lines of women I’ve spoken with around the country, and I think about how nice it would be to say to them “your elected officials care about this and want to make sure you are safe at home.” At this juncture, in too many cases, that would be a lie.

Until we prioritize this crime and deal with it like we should, we will continue to simply play catch-up. Feminist icon and our Executive Producer Gloria Steinem suggested that, rather than lining up ambulances at the bottom of the waterfall, it might be a good idea to build a partition at the top to stop families from cascading over the edge. That would be the more humane and proper approach. Lives and money will be saved (the economic costs to domestic violence are staggering), and we’ll all be able to sleep safer at night. Until then, the work continues. We work until we #EndPrivateViolence.