Josh Brown TV Interview A Reminder of NFL’s Domestic Violence Problem

Just in time for Super Bowl LI comes yet another chapter in the ongoing story of the NFL’s domestic violence problem. Former Giants star Josh Brown  drew headlines this week after he publicly admitted domestic violence. The admission came during an emotional interview February 2 with ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

Sports pundits are describing the interview as Brown’s effort to revive his professional football career; the Giants dropped him in October after he admitted the abuse to the team. The NFL had earlier suspended Brown for one game for the spring 2015 incident. He was arrested on suspicion of domestic assault in the fourth degree after Molly Brown, now his ex-wife, said he grabbed her wrist during an argument. Charges were never filed, according to numerous media accounts of the case.

The public apology has become a staple in celebrity efforts to repair their reputations and careers. And the he said-she said nature of the incident is, sadly, familiar. The Brown situation, like all domestic violence cases, does have its own nuances. Central to the ABC interview were Brown’s journal entries, in which he wrote that he had “been physically, emotionally and verbally” abusive toward Molly Brown. The journals became public as part of the investigation.

Here’s some of what he said on “Good Morning America:”

I mean, I had put my hands on her. I kicked the chair. I held her down. The holding down was the worst moment in our marriage. I never hit her. I never slapped her. I never choked her. I never did those types of things.

Later, he concedes that, “What I did was wrong. Period.” He goes on to say that domestic violence is not just physical abuse: “We’re talking intimidation and threats, the attempt to control, body language.”

Despite talking the talk about domestic violence, he drew a distinction between abuse and, well, actually hitting his wife. He still draws a distinction between his actions and, you know, real abusers. “The world now thinks I beat my wife,” he said in the television interview. “I have never hit this woman. I never hit her. Not once.”

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said Brown’s case is still open. We’ll see how the NFL applies its personal conduct policy, revised in 2014, after Ray Rice was caught on camera punching his then-fiancée in an elevator. Brown told ABC he’s hopeful he can play pro football again.

Super Bowl weekend, with more than 100 million people likely to watch the contest between the New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons, is a good time for the NFL to make it clear they plan to hold players accountable.

[ed: Interesting note on the body language in this interview. Brown shakes his head “no,” while saying “yes.”  A common non-verbal indicating a dishonest response.]

NFL Fumbles Again  — This Time On Greg Hardy Case

Another pro football season, another horrific domestic violence case involving an NFL player.

Last year it was Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson. This year it’s the aftermath of the Greg Hardy case.

According to a harrowing account by the sports news and commentary website Deadspin, Hardy’s then gNFL-Footballirlfriend, Nicole Holder ran from Hardy’s Charlotte, N.C., apartment in 2014 minutes after “he had, she said, thrown her against a tile bathtub wall, tossed her on a futon covered in assault rifles, and choked her until she told him to ‘kill me so I don’t have to.’”

When a police officer ordered her to stop and asked why she was crying, she gave this heartbreaking response: “It doesn’t matter. Nothing is going to happen to him anyways.” As Deadspin noted, she was, unfortunately, right:

Last year, Hardy was convicted of assault in a bench trial, but the charges were dismissed on appeal and, it was reported yesterday, expunged. He missed more than a season of football, but went on to sign with the Dallas Cowboys, for whom he’s become a bigger star than ever despite (or perhaps because of) a series of incidents ranging from making sexist comments in a press conference to going after a coach on the sidelines. Jerry Jones, the Cowboys’ billionaire owner, calls him a “real leader” who has the respect of all his teammates and inspires America’s Team.

Once again, a professional athlete – a highly paid celebrity who makes his living from an arguably violent sport – was not held accountable for a vicious attack on his intimate partner. Accountability for the offender is key to our work at Big Mountain Data. If the big guys – celebrities, athletes, wealthy men, cops – aren’t held accountable, it’s unlikely that the Average Joe taking out his aggressions on the woman he supposedly loves will ever pay the price for his unacceptable behavior.

Holder accepted a settlement from Hardy, which means she’s no longer talking about the case. Still, the Hardy case echoes patterns we’ve heard before:

  •             The abuse escalated over time.
  •             Weapons were in the home where the abuse occurred.
  •             The victim underplayed the abuse, saying she “fell down the stairs.”
  •             The victim told police she had not reported previous abuse because she feared the perpetrator.
  •             The perpetrator claims HE is the victim, although photo evidence from the police clearly disputes that.
  •             On the opening day the trial, a judge threw out the case when the accuser stopped cooperating with prosecutors.

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has faced criticism for signing and supporting Hardy. In response to Deadspin’s account of the Hardy case, SI.com’s Doug Farrar called on the NFL to take action on domestic violence. NFL leaders had seen the police photos of the Hardy case before Deadspin published them, he noted.

“The NFL needs to come out and say, ‘we have screwed this up royally,’” Farrar said. “The NFL has to do something real, not an empty statement from the leader, but something real.”

Here’s a thought: How about no longer enabling players who beat up women? Stop fumbling your response to domestic violence.

 

Ray Rice Wins Appeal Against the NFL

Ray Rice, Janay Rice

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks alongside his wife, Janay, during a news conference. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend we learned that Ray Rice won his appeal against the NFL, reinstating him into the league with the eligibility to sign with any team. Rice won the appeal on a technicality. According to Article 46 of the NFL collective bargaining agreement, Rice is not allowed to be punished twice for the same incident. Since the NFL originally didn’t take the assault against his then-fiancée seriously, Rice has the possibility to continue to play football without any serious consequences. Devastating, but not at all surprising in a society that clearly values men’s careers instead of women’s lives. While many argue Rice is just a one time offender with a squeaky clean history, I am having a hard believing that beating your partner unconscious is a “mistake” that can be easily rectified.

On February 15th, Ray Rice and his then fiancée, Janay Palmer, were arrested and charged with simple assault-domestic violence after a “ minor physical altercation” that resulted in Palmer being dragged unconsciously off an elevator by Rice. Even though the police had retained the video of the “altercation” when Rice and Palmer were arrested, Rice was only charged with simple assault. How does beating someone unconscious equate to simple assault?

It wasn’t until TMZ released the infamous video of Rice beating Palmer on the elevator that Rice received serious charges for beating her unconsciously. Even with this evidence, his attorney has been on a crusade to downplay the entire incident as a lovers quarrel. With no explanation, Rice and Palmer pushed up their wedding and got married after Rice’s charges were upped to aggravated assault by a grand jury. A suspicious move that helped minimize the whole affair.

Domestic violence is not an issue to be taken lightly. Rice’s case should have served as an example to others that if you use violence as a means of communication, there will be severe and lasting consequences. It’s the least that can be done when a victim of violence has to live with that moment for the rest of their lives. Instead this case has become one of the many that clearly demonstrates the need for a cultural and systemic revolution regarding the fight against domestic violence.


For a complete timeline of the Ray Rice assault case, go here.