New Jersey Hosts Symposium on Intimate Partner Innovation

Big Mountain Data is proud to announce:

21st Century Approaches to Ending Intimate Partner Violence

Monday, October 30, 2017

Wilson Hall Auditorium
9 a.m. – Check-in and coffee
9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Program (includes lunch)

Registration: Free

Register Online

It is estimated that one in four women and one in seven men aged 18 and older in the US have been the victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner.

In New Jersey, an act of domestic violence occurs every 7.29 minutes.

There are ongoing efforts in the state of New Jersey to bring innovative approaches to the problem of domestic violence and this program provides one additional opportunity for law enforcement and community members to hear about other approaches and to engage in dialogue.

The program will feature a documentary video about High Point, North Carolina along with a panel presentation that includes:

  • Shay Harger, Director of Victim Services at Family Service of the Piedmont
  • Chief Kenneth Shultz, chief of the High Point Police Department
  • Dr. Jessie Holton, Research Coordinator/Program Evaluator at Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, Titusville, FL
  • Amina Bey, Executive Director, Shani Baraka Women’s Resource Center, Newark, NJ
  • Susan Levine, Victim Support Program Coordinator, 180 Turning Lives Around
  • Tom Parr, Monmouth University ’85 alum and documentary filmmaker
  • Igor Kovalik, Director, editor, entrepreneur
  • Susan Scrupski, Founder of Big Mountain Data

This program is sponsored by
The Department of Justice, US Attorney’s Office, District of New Jersey
State of New Jersey Office of the Attorney General, Division of Criminal Justice
Office of the Monmouth County Prosecutor
The School of Social Work, Department of Criminal Justice, Monmouth University
and 180 Turning Lives Around

Presenters

Shay Harger

Shay Harger

Shay Harger is the Director of Victim Services at Family Service of the Piedmont in High Point and Greensboro, North Carolina. Shay has over 13 years of experience in victim services with an extensive background in providing direct services to both adult and child victims, victim services administration and providing professional training locally and nationwide. As Director of Victim Services, Shay oversees a staff of 50 which includes, a North Carolina accredited Batterers Intervention Program, two National Children’s Alliance accredited Children’s Advocacy Centers, two Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Shelters and two Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Advocacy Programs.

Shay currently serves as a faculty member for the Domestic Violence Danger Assessment and Risk Management national training provided through Emerge, in Cambridge, MA. Shay also provides nationwide training for the High Point Offender Focused Domestic Violence Initiative, often referred to as “The High Point Model”. Shay is a member of the High Point Initiative Team that won the 2016 Center for Problem Oriented Policing Herman Goldstein Award.

 

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz has been a sworn officer with the High Point Police Department for over 28 years. After serving in multiple capacities throughout his tenure, he was selected as Chief in April of 2016. He now works to continue the innovative approaches that the High Point Police Department is known for as the Agency continues to specifically target violent crime and prioritize safety in High Point. As a law enforcement officer, Chief Shultz understands the vital role that partnerships and community support plays in the success of any of their efforts. As such, he prioritizes all cooperative endeavors and works to strengthen them whenever the chances arise so that together, they can more successfully address the challenges that are faced throughout the City.

Chief Shultz received a Bachelor’s Degree from Laurel University in Management and Ethics. He has also received professional training through the FBI National Academy in Quantico, VA. and the Senior Executives in State and Local Government course offered as part of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Executive Education Program in Boston.

Chief Shultz was born in High Point and grew up in Davidson County. After graduating from Ledford High School, he joined the Army Reserve and was a member of the 11th Special Forces Group (Airborne). While working at the police department, he completed a six year enlistment with the Army Reserves, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant (E-6).

 

Officer Jessie Holton

Dr. Jessie Holton

Dr. Jessie Holton has been a police officer and organizational sociologist with the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office for the last 12 years. He has spent the majority of his law enforcement career in the Special Victim’s Unit and in Research & Development. While working as a full-time investigator he completed has Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctorate degrees at the University of Central Florida. His research background includes implementing several innovative programs such as the SVU therapy dog program, the Interstate Human Trafficking Probe, the Domestic Violence Strangulation, Inmate Re-entry, PTSD in Law Enforcement, and several other nationally recognized programs. Additionally, he is responsible for creating a researcher-practitioner partnership called the L.E.A.D.E.R.S. initiative, or Law Enforcement Direct Engagement Research System. This partnership allows several research institutions to conduct studies within the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office to evaluate and improve police practices while also allowing graduate students to experience applied research methods. The results of Dr. Holton’s work have produced multiple presentations at both professional & academic conferences as well as publications in peer-review journals and invited-book chapters.

 

Susan Scrupski

Susan Scrupski

Susan Scrupski is a veteran technology executive and entrepreneur. From studying computer science, to the early days of the UNIX wars, to the blockbuster market for IT services, to the advent of the commercial Internet in the late 90s, Susan has always seen technology advancing a new way to work– a new way to connect and improve the world in which we live. She has been a serial entrepreneur identifying trends early and seizing first-mover advantage to create businesses that fill a new niche. Her businesses have ranged from traditional consulting advisory; in-depth research and analysis firms; large-scale communities of interest; redefining how advisory, project work, and leadership development is handled in the networked 21st century, to her current social impact startup that focuses on applying data-driven solutions to domestic violence: Big Mountain Data. With this new venture, Susan is applying her resources, her international network of career relationships, and her understanding of technology to identify and build data-driven solutions to impact domestic violence.

 

Tom Parr

Tom Parr

Tom Parr, a Monmouth graduate (class of 1985) is a film director and advertising creative director. His recent work for the Detroit Pistons won him 2 Emmy’s for directing. Tom, has deep advertising roots, having worked at Ammirati & Puris & BBDO (both in New York) and at McCann Erickson in Detroit. His portfolio includes work for Doritos, (Super Bowl) HotJobs.com, (Super Bowl) Visa, FedEx, Bumble Bee, Coca Cola, Cadillac and Buick, for whom he created the groundbreaking Tiger Trap multi-platform event. When Tom isn’t making film or taking photos he is painting or playing guitar. You can see some of his work at Exit98films.com.

 

Susan Levine

Susan Levine

Susan Levine, BA, is the Victim Support Program Coordinator at 180 Turning Lives Around (180) in Hazlet, New Jersey. She is responsible for the day-to-day supervision of the Domestic Violence Response Team program (DVRT) and the Sexual Violence Program, which includes the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART). In addition to facilitating the mandated training for 180’s DVRT and SART volunteer victim advocates and direct services staff, she also conducts law enforcement in-service training at police departments in Monmouth County and at the Monmouth County Police Academy. Ms. Levine also presents lectures on the DVRT program and Alcohol/Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault to the New Jersey State Police trooper recruit classes.

In 2000, Ms. Levine began her work with 180 by providing direct service to victims of domestic violence as a volunteer DVRT Advocate/Team Leader. She is an original member of the Marlboro DVRT, a collaboration of 180 and the Marlboro Township Police Department. Ms. Levine has co-authored DVRT SOP revisions adopted by Monmouth County police departments, including the Mandatory Call-out Policy, which has been shared with law enforcement agencies throughout New Jersey.

Ms. Levine has conducted domestic violence and sexual violence training statewide for judges, court personal, prosecutors, command staff at US Army Fort Monmouth, and for military Sexual Assault Response advocates at US Naval Weapons Station Earle. In addition, she presents workshops for professionals offered at the New Jersey Coalition to End Domestic Violence and the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and to speaks to classes at Monmouth University and Brookdale Community College.

 

Igor Kovalik

Igor Kovalik

Igor Kovalik is a director/editor/entrepreneur. Most recently winning an Emmy Award with Tom Parr for their directing work for the Detroit Pistons’ 2015-2016 TV Campaign. The Campaign also received top honors winning the 2016 NBA Marketing Award as selected by the other teams.

Born in the former Czechoslovakia and raised in Toronto, Kovalik studied film at NYU and eventually settled in Los Angeles. In 1997 he opened up an editing company that eventually became Beast Editorial. Under Kovalik’s management it grew into one of the largest commercial editorial companies in the USA with offices in LA, New York, San Francisco, Austin, Chicago, Detroit and Atlanta.

Since selling his interest in Beast to Deluxe Media, he’s focused primarily on content creation and documentary work. He has traveled around the world shooting and creating viral campaigns for Western Union, Princess Cruises, INTEL and the UN.

Along with his commercial clients, Kovalik has been active in the music video industry having worked with Pink, Shakira, REM, and The Black Eyed Peas among others. He has been collaborating with Linkin Park since 2007 and has had a hand in every music video they have created since.

Kovalik has worked on numerous feature length films including projects for Oprah Winfrey and Michael Mann. Kovalik has won numerous Clios, MTV Music Video Awards, Cannes Lions and an Emmy.

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NCAA Teams’ Wait and See Approach to Domestic Violence Unsurprisingly Ineffective

After Rutgers’ close loss to Washington State on September 12, Rutgers’ leading receiver Leonte Carroo slammed a woman onto the concrete. The victim sustained injuries to her hip, both her palms, and the left side of her head. As stated in the complaint filed in municipal court, the 20-year-old victim and Carroo previously dated. According to the victim in a phone interview with The Record, she remembers being picked up and dropped and “going high in the air.” She also expressed concern about backlash from the football player’s many supporters, adding, “I hope they don’t blame it [the suspension] on me.”

Carroo, a 2014 Big 10 Selection who recently opted out of the NFL draft, has pled not guilty to a domestic-violence related charge and is out on $1000 bail. One of seven players arrested in the last month for various charges including home invasion and assault, Carroo has been suspended indefinitely from the team.

Coincidentally, Rutgers head coach Kyle Flood was also suspended the following week for three games and fined $50,000 after a university investigation found that he inappropriately communicated with a player’s instructor in regard to an academic issue. Yet, despite the recent criminal and unethical behavior,  Rutgers athletic director Julie Hermann says the program still has her unwavering support. “I can tell you from my personal interactions that this locker room is filled with the type of leaders and quality young men that will continue to serve as exemplary ambassadors for the university,” she said in a September 14 statement.

Rutgers’ player Leonte Carroo (Photo: Ed Mulholland, USA TODAY Sports)

Of course, the events at Rutgers didn’t happen in a vacuum. In May, Louisiana State University (LSU) reserve offensive lineman Jevonte Domond was arrested on a felony charge of battery and domestic abuse, including strangulation. Initially suspended and with charges still pending, Domond is back on the team without having missed so much as a practice. “We’re letting the disposition of whatever entanglement he’s involved in run its course. He’s not suspended,” said head football coach Les Miles speaking to media after the start of fall training camp. 

Unfortunately, LSU is not the only university utilizing a  “wait and see” approach.

Just last month Baylor University defensive end Sam Ukwuachu was found guilty of second-degree sexual assault. Ukwuachu, a freshman All-American, transferred to Baylor in 2013 following dismissal from the Boise State football team for erratic behavior and a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. According to officials at Boise State, they were unaware of reports of violence committed by Ukwuachu against his girlfriend at the time and his dismissal was unrelated.

In the face of Ukwuachu’s indictment for sexual assault against a different woman while at Baylor, Baylor did acknowledge he had “some issues.” After sitting out in 2014 for unknown reasons (despite being eligible to play), he was expected to be on the field for the 2015 season. However, following Ukwuachu’s conviction for second-degree sexual assault, he was sentenced to six months in jail, 10 years of felony probation, and 400 hours of community service.

 

New Jersey Domestic Violence Registry Bill Moves Forward

New Jersey is a step closer to creating the United States’ first statewide Internet registry for domestic violence offenders. The state’s Assembly Women and Children Committee June 18 approved New Jersey Assembly Bill A-2539, also known as Misty’s Law. The registry would be similar to the sex offender registry. Individuals would be able to research potential partners and learn about any history of domestic violence. It would also allow survivors of domestic violence to track their abuser’s location.

“A few clicks of the mouse could help prevent someone from falling into an abusive relationship,” Democratic Assemblywoman Carmelo G. Garcia said in a press release on PolitickerNJ.com. “This could prove an invaluable tool, especially given how hard it often is for victims to extricate themselves from this type of relationship.”

The law would allow any member of the public to view records that include: the defendant’s name and any aliases; any aggravated assault offense involving domestic violence for which the defendant was convicted; the date and location of disposition; a brief description of any such offense, a general description of the defendant’s modus operandi; the defendant’s age, race, sex, date of birth, height, weight, hair, eye color and any distinguishing scars or tattoos; a photograph of the defendant and the date on which the photograph was entered into the registry; the make, model, color, year and license plate number of any vehicle operated by the defendant; and the street address, zip code, municipality and county in which the defendant resides.

Misty Ramos

Misty Ramos was murdered by her boyfriend in 2012.

The bill is named after Misty Ramos. She was strangled to death in June 2012 by her former boyfriend, Noel Irizarry, at her home. Irizarry was sentenced to 30 years in prison for her death. Misty Ramos’ brother, Kell Ramos is president of  Domestic Violence Action Group USA, which supports the bill. After Izarry’s arrest, Ramos learned that his slain sister’s boyfriend spent 10 years in prison for slashing the throat of his ex-girlfriend, NJ.com reported. Ramos is a documentary maker working on a film about the issue.

The group will focus on men, Ramos told NJ.com. “We need men to be part of the solution,” Ramos told the news outlet. “Focusing on the woman is needed, but what happens to the next generation? The same cycle repeats itself. There’s going to be more men doing the same thing. How do you stop that? Other men have to hold men accountable to their actions.”

 

It’s Outrageous That Ray Rice’s Domestic Violence Charges Dropped

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks alongside his wife Janay during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks alongside his wife Janay during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team’s practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Remember your outrage at news that Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice knocked his fiancée unconscious? Remember being outraged that the NFL commissioner suspended Rice for just two games before he (supposedly only then) saw the video of the violent incident and indefinitely suspended Rice? Prepare to be outraged again: A New Jersey judge last week dismissed domestic violence charges Rice because he had completed the terms of his pretrial intervention.

Under terms of the program, Rice paid $125 in fines and received anger management counseling, AP reported. The intervention program is seen as a key tool as the state tries to keep low-level suspects out of jail, the news outlet wrote. Only 70 of the more than 15,000 domestic violence assault cases adjudicated from 2010 to 2013 in New Jersey’s Superior Court were admitted into the pretrial intervention program, the AP reported. According to New Jersey guidelines, offenders who commit violent crimes should “generally be rejected” from the program.

Cue the outrage.

Why is Rice considered a low-level suspect? The incident made public was clearly violent, no matter how many times Rice and his lawyer call it “a misunderstanding.” When high-profile celebrities and athletes are not held accountable, it sends a message that they are above the law. Authorities here missed a chance to show their intolerance for domestic violence.

The outcome of the Rice case, unfortunately, is all too common. Of the 15,029 people charged in New Jersey with assault in domestic violence cases from 2010 to 2013, 8,203 had their cases dismissed or downgraded to a lower court, according to the data provided by the state judiciary, AP reported. Nearly 3,100 pleaded guilty, 13 were found guilty at trial and nine were found not guilty.

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) called the intervention program for Rice inappropriate. “Given the severity of Mr. Rice’s violence and the charges filed against him, it is concerning that this program was ever presented, and accepted as an option,” the statement said.

“This is an example of why victims don’t come forward, why they do not feel safe, and why we still can’t trust systems to hold perpetrators accountable,” NCADV Executive Director Ruth Glenn said in a statement.

Electronic Monitoring Setback in New Jersey

A new report released by the office of the New Jersey’s Acting State Attorney  delivered a blow to domestic violence advocates in favor of statewide electronic monitoring for repeat offenders.

N.J. Assemblyman Troy Singleton (D – Mount Laurel) took umbrage with the report’s findings and questioned the voracity of its analysis and investigation.  New Jersey advocates have been lobbying to enact electronic monitoring by passing “Lisa’s Law,” a bill that was crafted following the death of Letizia “Lisa” Zindell of Toms River who was murdered by her ex-fiancé in violation of a restraining order.

Singleton’s remarks were made available via video press release.

Singleton, Advocates Call for Renewed Action on ‘Lisa’s Law’ at Start of Domestic Violence Awareness Month from NJ Assembly Democratic Office on Vimeo.