Onondaga County, NY Pushes for Public Awareness to end Domestic Violence

Randi Bregman, Executive Director of Vera House in Syracuse, gives the organization’s annual Report to the Community Wednesday ELLEN ABBOTT / WRVO NEWS

The contagious myth that domestic violence takes place in private and should accordingly be kept from public consciousness has infected many communities throughout the U.S. Onondaga County in New York, however, believes they have found the perfect antidote to ending the epidemic of public ignorance on issues of domestic violence: transparency.

Each year, Vera House, a domestic and sexual violence service agency based in Syracuse, publishes an Annual Community Report. In an interview with The Daily Orange, Randi Bregman, executive director of Vera House, emphasized the importance of public knowledge of domestic violence in every community.

“Every incident of domestic and sexual violence is, in fact, a public issue,” said Bregman. “Having a public opportunity to talk about the impact, to let the survivors’ stories be heard, is essential.”

The 2016 report published by Vera House for Onondaga County showed a significant improvement in law enforcement’s supervision of domestic violence offenders since beginning their mission to end public ignorance. In 2015, Onondaga County’s Department of Probation supervised 220 offenders. The very next year, almost one thousand offenders were under direct supervision and over one thousand were issued temporary orders of protection by the Onondaga County Family Court, a critical increase from only 959 the year before.

Below, Figure 1 shows the remaining data Vera House acquired from law enforcement crime reports for the 2016 year. The data shows that out of 10,963 total calls of reported domestic violence disputes, 6,696 were answered by the authorities.

Figure 1

The Vera House report does not account for homicides that occur as a result of domestic dispute. William Fitzpatrick, an Onondaga County district attorney and director of the Victim Assistance Program (VAP), stated that one out of every four homicides in Onondaga County is directly related to domestic violence. Syracuse, the largest community in the county with a population of 140,000, had a total of 31 homicides in 2016, six of which were directly linked to domestic violence; several are still under investigation.

Elevating public knowledge about the ravages of domestic violence is part of the mission of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV). NCADV’s report showed that, of all intimate partner homicides, 20% of victims were not the intimate partner of the offender, but close family, friends, neighbors, law enforcement, or third-party bystanders.  These collateral damage statistics don’t often show up in the national numbers surrounding aggregate domestic violence homicides. 

In addition to the loss of life, NCADV’s National Statistics Domestic Violence Fact Sheet shows an undeviating correlation between domestic violence and economic defects in a community. About 20-60% of domestic violence victims lose their jobs as a result of their abuse. This accumulates to a total loss of eight million days of paid work per year or 32,000 full time jobs. It is estimated that this inability to work costs the U.S. economy between $5.8 billion and $12.6 billion annually.

The connections are clear: domestic violence may occur in private, unseen by much of the public eye, but it has an undeniable ripple effect across American communities. In addition to the economic and familial aftermath, local officials must strive to educate themselves on issues regarding domestic violence and contribute to the public’s understanding as often as possible. Similar to Big Mountain Data, organizations such as the Vera House work closely with law enforcement agencies across the nation to make this knowledge easily accessible to the public. 

 

New Jersey Hosts Symposium on Intimate Partner Innovation

Big Mountain Data is proud to announce:

21st Century Approaches to Ending Intimate Partner Violence

Monday, October 30, 2017

Wilson Hall Auditorium
9 a.m. – Check-in and coffee
9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Program (includes lunch)

Registration: Free

Register Online

It is estimated that one in four women and one in seven men aged 18 and older in the US have been the victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner.

In New Jersey, an act of domestic violence occurs every 7.29 minutes.

There are ongoing efforts in the state of New Jersey to bring innovative approaches to the problem of domestic violence and this program provides one additional opportunity for law enforcement and community members to hear about other approaches and to engage in dialogue.

The program will feature a documentary video about High Point, North Carolina along with a panel presentation that includes:

  • Shay Harger, Director of Victim Services at Family Service of the Piedmont
  • Chief Kenneth Shultz, chief of the High Point Police Department
  • Dr. Jessie Holton, Research Coordinator/Program Evaluator at Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, Titusville, FL
  • Amina Bey, Executive Director, Shani Baraka Women’s Resource Center, Newark, NJ
  • Susan Levine, Victim Support Program Coordinator, 180 Turning Lives Around
  • Tom Parr, Monmouth University ’85 alum and documentary filmmaker
  • Igor Kovalik, Director, editor, entrepreneur
  • Susan Scrupski, Founder of Big Mountain Data

This program is sponsored by
The Department of Justice, US Attorney’s Office, District of New Jersey
State of New Jersey Office of the Attorney General, Division of Criminal Justice
Office of the Monmouth County Prosecutor
The School of Social Work, Department of Criminal Justice, Monmouth University
and 180 Turning Lives Around

Presenters

Shay Harger

Shay Harger

Shay Harger is the Director of Victim Services at Family Service of the Piedmont in High Point and Greensboro, North Carolina. Shay has over 13 years of experience in victim services with an extensive background in providing direct services to both adult and child victims, victim services administration and providing professional training locally and nationwide. As Director of Victim Services, Shay oversees a staff of 50 which includes, a North Carolina accredited Batterers Intervention Program, two National Children’s Alliance accredited Children’s Advocacy Centers, two Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Shelters and two Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Advocacy Programs.

Shay currently serves as a faculty member for the Domestic Violence Danger Assessment and Risk Management national training provided through Emerge, in Cambridge, MA. Shay also provides nationwide training for the High Point Offender Focused Domestic Violence Initiative, often referred to as “The High Point Model”. Shay is a member of the High Point Initiative Team that won the 2016 Center for Problem Oriented Policing Herman Goldstein Award.

 

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz

Chief Kenneth J. Shultz has been a sworn officer with the High Point Police Department for over 28 years. After serving in multiple capacities throughout his tenure, he was selected as Chief in April of 2016. He now works to continue the innovative approaches that the High Point Police Department is known for as the Agency continues to specifically target violent crime and prioritize safety in High Point. As a law enforcement officer, Chief Shultz understands the vital role that partnerships and community support plays in the success of any of their efforts. As such, he prioritizes all cooperative endeavors and works to strengthen them whenever the chances arise so that together, they can more successfully address the challenges that are faced throughout the City.

Chief Shultz received a Bachelor’s Degree from Laurel University in Management and Ethics. He has also received professional training through the FBI National Academy in Quantico, VA. and the Senior Executives in State and Local Government course offered as part of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Executive Education Program in Boston.

Chief Shultz was born in High Point and grew up in Davidson County. After graduating from Ledford High School, he joined the Army Reserve and was a member of the 11th Special Forces Group (Airborne). While working at the police department, he completed a six year enlistment with the Army Reserves, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant (E-6).

 

Officer Jessie Holton

Dr. Jessie Holton

Dr. Jessie Holton has been a police officer and organizational sociologist with the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office for the last 12 years. He has spent the majority of his law enforcement career in the Special Victim’s Unit and in Research & Development. While working as a full-time investigator he completed has Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctorate degrees at the University of Central Florida. His research background includes implementing several innovative programs such as the SVU therapy dog program, the Interstate Human Trafficking Probe, the Domestic Violence Strangulation, Inmate Re-entry, PTSD in Law Enforcement, and several other nationally recognized programs. Additionally, he is responsible for creating a researcher-practitioner partnership called the L.E.A.D.E.R.S. initiative, or Law Enforcement Direct Engagement Research System. This partnership allows several research institutions to conduct studies within the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office to evaluate and improve police practices while also allowing graduate students to experience applied research methods. The results of Dr. Holton’s work have produced multiple presentations at both professional & academic conferences as well as publications in peer-review journals and invited-book chapters.

 

Susan Scrupski

Susan Scrupski

Susan Scrupski is a veteran technology executive and entrepreneur. From studying computer science, to the early days of the UNIX wars, to the blockbuster market for IT services, to the advent of the commercial Internet in the late 90s, Susan has always seen technology advancing a new way to work– a new way to connect and improve the world in which we live. She has been a serial entrepreneur identifying trends early and seizing first-mover advantage to create businesses that fill a new niche. Her businesses have ranged from traditional consulting advisory; in-depth research and analysis firms; large-scale communities of interest; redefining how advisory, project work, and leadership development is handled in the networked 21st century, to her current social impact startup that focuses on applying data-driven solutions to domestic violence: Big Mountain Data. With this new venture, Susan is applying her resources, her international network of career relationships, and her understanding of technology to identify and build data-driven solutions to impact domestic violence.

 

Tom Parr

Tom Parr

Tom Parr, a Monmouth graduate (class of 1985) is a film director and advertising creative director. His recent work for the Detroit Pistons won him 2 Emmy’s for directing. Tom, has deep advertising roots, having worked at Ammirati & Puris & BBDO (both in New York) and at McCann Erickson in Detroit. His portfolio includes work for Doritos, (Super Bowl) HotJobs.com, (Super Bowl) Visa, FedEx, Bumble Bee, Coca Cola, Cadillac and Buick, for whom he created the groundbreaking Tiger Trap multi-platform event. When Tom isn’t making film or taking photos he is painting or playing guitar. You can see some of his work at Exit98films.com.

 

Susan Levine

Susan Levine

Susan Levine, BA, is the Victim Support Program Coordinator at 180 Turning Lives Around (180) in Hazlet, New Jersey. She is responsible for the day-to-day supervision of the Domestic Violence Response Team program (DVRT) and the Sexual Violence Program, which includes the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART). In addition to facilitating the mandated training for 180’s DVRT and SART volunteer victim advocates and direct services staff, she also conducts law enforcement in-service training at police departments in Monmouth County and at the Monmouth County Police Academy. Ms. Levine also presents lectures on the DVRT program and Alcohol/Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault to the New Jersey State Police trooper recruit classes.

In 2000, Ms. Levine began her work with 180 by providing direct service to victims of domestic violence as a volunteer DVRT Advocate/Team Leader. She is an original member of the Marlboro DVRT, a collaboration of 180 and the Marlboro Township Police Department. Ms. Levine has co-authored DVRT SOP revisions adopted by Monmouth County police departments, including the Mandatory Call-out Policy, which has been shared with law enforcement agencies throughout New Jersey.

Ms. Levine has conducted domestic violence and sexual violence training statewide for judges, court personal, prosecutors, command staff at US Army Fort Monmouth, and for military Sexual Assault Response advocates at US Naval Weapons Station Earle. In addition, she presents workshops for professionals offered at the New Jersey Coalition to End Domestic Violence and the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and to speaks to classes at Monmouth University and Brookdale Community College.

 

Igor Kovalik

Igor Kovalik

Igor Kovalik is a director/editor/entrepreneur. Most recently winning an Emmy Award with Tom Parr for their directing work for the Detroit Pistons’ 2015-2016 TV Campaign. The Campaign also received top honors winning the 2016 NBA Marketing Award as selected by the other teams.

Born in the former Czechoslovakia and raised in Toronto, Kovalik studied film at NYU and eventually settled in Los Angeles. In 1997 he opened up an editing company that eventually became Beast Editorial. Under Kovalik’s management it grew into one of the largest commercial editorial companies in the USA with offices in LA, New York, San Francisco, Austin, Chicago, Detroit and Atlanta.

Since selling his interest in Beast to Deluxe Media, he’s focused primarily on content creation and documentary work. He has traveled around the world shooting and creating viral campaigns for Western Union, Princess Cruises, INTEL and the UN.

Along with his commercial clients, Kovalik has been active in the music video industry having worked with Pink, Shakira, REM, and The Black Eyed Peas among others. He has been collaborating with Linkin Park since 2007 and has had a hand in every music video they have created since.

Kovalik has worked on numerous feature length films including projects for Oprah Winfrey and Michael Mann. Kovalik has won numerous Clios, MTV Music Video Awards, Cannes Lions and an Emmy.

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Big Mountain Data heads to Nashville

We are joining our partner, Superion, in Nashville, TN this month to host a screening of our film preview and  to discuss the ways data can inform the criminal justice ecosystem surrounding the intimate partner violence challenge.  If you’re a Superion customer going to SUGA 2017, we look forward to seeing you there.  Our film preview will be in Hermitage C at 2:15pm on June 20.  We will feature our film team, as well as host a conversation with Chief Ken Shultz of the High Point Police and Shay Harger, victim services director at Family Services of the Piedmont.

Big Mountain Data Assembles Data Analysis Panel at #IACP2016

IACP2016Law enforcement is on the front lines of domestic violence.  Before we can implement policies and procedures to hold offenders accountable, we need to get an accurate portrayal of what is happening behind closed doors in our neighborhoods, towns, and cities.

Domestic violence rears its ugly head every day where at least three people are murdered at the hands of someone they know intimately.  On average, across the U.S., domestic violence homicides constitute at least a third of all homicides every year. Moreover, it’s one of the most predictable homicides law enforcement must confront on an annual basis. Officers new to the force start to see the predictable patterns emerge soon after they begin their careers.  It’s for this reason, Big Mountain Data works with law enforcement to demonstrate how the data they have already in their RMS and CAD systems can reveal answers today.

Our longtime partner, SunGard Public Sector, invited us to orchestrate a panel at this year’s International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) conference to discuss how data analysis played a major role in the highly successful High Point Model, now recognized by the DOJ’s Office of Violence Against Women.

The workshop will be moderated by V.P. Kevin Lafeber, of SunGard Public Sector. Participating on the panel will be retired Chief Marty Sumner, who led the domestic violence initiative for High Point for the past 7 years, as well as the crime analysis team from High Point and SunGard PS that had to modify the RMS in order to effectively implement the ground-breaking tracking system.  Chief Ken Shultz will talk about future improvements and enhancements to the OFDVI strategy.

The IACP conference will be held October 15-18 in San Diego, CA. This session will fill up early, so be sure to reserve your spot.

session2

 

 

Leveling Up on the High Point Story

HP1079_coverReaders of this blog should know we’ve been working on a film since our inception.  The story, which we have been calling, Turning Point, is a documentary about a city in North Carolina that got serious about its domestic violence problem.  With documentaries, the power of the story sometimes reveals itself the further you get into the process.  This is exactly what happened with our film team. At some point last year, we all came to the same conclusion: This story is bigger than us. We knew we had a tiger by the tail that deserved a mass audience and higher production values.

Today, after a few months of deliberation and putting the pieces together, we’re announcing we’re partnering with a world class documentary filmmaker to produce the High Point story.  We’re starting over to create a feature film with an ambitious budget and with professionals who are expert filmmakers and storytellers. The amazing news is, we will continue to work on this project creatively. Our two directors will be filming and editing the story.  My role will be to continue to advise on the story, and pitch in on fund-raising.

Our partner is The Documentary Group.  The “Doc Group,” as its known in the film industry, is one of the leading documentary filmmakers in the world.  The company was founded in 2006 by core members of PJ Productions following the death of legendary broadcaster Peter Jennings.  The producers and directors were the team behind Jennings’ documentaries at ABC News.  We had our first meeting with the doc group in November, and decided to move forward together to tell this incredible story.  This week, the film team is back in High Point kicking off the first of many on-location shoots.

Our producer on the film, Tom Yellin, was recently nominated for an Academy Award for Cartel Land.  Cartel Land is a feature documentary that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2015.  It has since won a series of high profile industry recognition awards and accolades including the 2015 George Polk Award for Documentary Film.  Next Sunday, February 28, we hope you’ll tune in to the Oscars and wish Tom well.

The High Point story has the potential to make a difference in the field of domestic violence unlike nothing else we could have imagined when we started thinking about fresh, new ways to look at this age-old social problem that results in injuries, broken families, and deaths every day.  We hope you share in our excitement and anticipation for the completion of this game-changing story.

 

When The Batterer Hides Behind A Badge

Advocates often cite fear, shame and stigma as reasons some domestic violence victims hesitate to report their abuse. Turns out those pressures may be even stronger among families with a member working in law enforcement.

Two studies cited by the National Center for Women and Policing (NCWP), at least 40 percent of law enforcement families experience domestic violence. That’s four times as high an incidence than in families in the general population.

policebadgeVictims of a police officer are particularly vulnerable because their offender has a gun, knows the location of women’s shelters and “knows how to manipulate the system to avoid penalty and/or shift blame to the victim, according to the NCWP.  The organization also notes a failure of police department policies and a history of “exceedingly light discipline.”

Family violence by law enforcement is especially heinous because of its misuse of power. When cops refuse to police themselves, it’s the worst example of the Thin Blue Line.

Retired Capt. Donna Roman Hernandez, who served 29 years in law enforcement in New Jersey, bravely shares her abuse at the hands her police officer father on the website corrections.com.

“My fear was that if I disclosed the abuse to my police department, would they question how I could I protect others if I could not protect myself?” Hernandez writes. “Throughout my law enforcement career I never disclosed the abuse. I suffered in silence and hid my bruises and scars underneath my police uniform, guarded my family’s secret and internalized the guilt and shame of the abuse. Ironically, I arrested domestic violence offenders for the same acts of violence I allowed my father to perpetrate upon me.”

She shares a harrowing account of finally standing up to her father after he abused her and her mother for years. Her experience, she writes, “speaks to the global widespread epidemics of child abuse and domestic violence that affect women and men from all socioeconomic groups, races, cultures, religions and professions, including law enforcement.”

She concludes with a core philosophy of Big Mountain Data: All domestic violence offenders must be held accountable – even if the abuser is a cop.