Big Mountain Data Assembles Data Analysis Panel at #IACP2016

IACP2016Law enforcement is on the front lines of domestic violence.  Before we can implement policies and procedures to hold offenders accountable, we need to get an accurate portrayal of what is happening behind closed doors in our neighborhoods, towns, and cities.

Domestic violence rears its ugly head every day where at least three people are murdered at the hands of someone they know intimately.  On average, across the U.S., domestic violence homicides constitute at least a third of all homicides every year. Moreover, it’s one of the most predictable homicides law enforcement must confront on an annual basis. Officers new to the force start to see the predictable patterns emerge soon after they begin their careers.  It’s for this reason, Big Mountain Data works with law enforcement to demonstrate how the data they have already in their RMS and CAD systems can reveal answers today.

Our longtime partner, SunGard Public Sector, invited us to orchestrate a panel at this year’s International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) conference to discuss how data analysis played a major role in the highly successful High Point Model, now recognized by the DOJ’s Office of Violence Against Women.

The workshop will be moderated by V.P. Kevin Lafeber, of SunGard Public Sector. Participating on the panel will be retired Chief Marty Sumner, who led the domestic violence initiative for High Point for the past 7 years, as well as the crime analysis team from High Point and SunGard PS that had to modify the RMS in order to effectively implement the ground-breaking tracking system.  Chief Ken Shultz will talk about future improvements and enhancements to the OFDVI strategy.

The IACP conference will be held October 15-18 in San Diego, CA. This session will fill up early, so be sure to reserve your spot.

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Private Violence: A Documentary That Will Save Lives

pv-stills-6Private Violence, directed by Cynthia Hill, is an intimate portrayal of the heartbreaking reality of domestic violence in the United States. The film takes a new approach to the issue by exploring the unattainable answer to the question: “Why doesn’t she just leave?” Through the eyes of survivors, Deanna Walters and Kit Gruelle, the audience learns why asking that question is futile. It’s not up to the victim to end the abuse.

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Through the legal case of Walters, the audience experiences alongside her the variety of injustices a victim goes through during the healing process. The most enraging being the amount of burden society and the justice system places on the victim, rather than the offender, to end the abuse. Throughout her abuse and later on during the case, Walters was constantly asked, “Why didn’t you just leave?”

“This film will literally save lives,” says executive producer and prominent feminist Gloria Steinem on the documentary, Private Violence.

In the film, Walters’ case clearly demonstrates the flaws in local, state and federal justice systems when it comes to domestic violence. The overwhelming responsibility placed on a victim to provide proof of her abuse is unacceptable. And the fact that victims need to experience violence at a level that is seen as “serious” in the eyes of the law is abhorrent. Even then, assault against a woman is still not considered a serious offense. Walter’s abuser almost killed her and was originally only charged with a misdemeanor. One of the main characters, survivor and advocate,  Kit Gruelle, explained in the beginning of the film the consequences when the legal system refuses to see domestic violence as a serious crime.   She paints a bleak picture, “I sometimes refer to restraining orders as a last will and testament… There’s probably 45 or 50 orders here, and every single one of the women who went to obtain these orders of protection was murdered in precisely the ways that they said they would be.”

There’s no question this film is an important tool in the fight against domestic violence in the United States. It demonstrates why offender-based programs like the one in North Carolina’s High Point Police Department are vital to end this injustice once and for all.

 If you find yourself in Austin, Texas in December, Big Mountain Data is sponsoring a public viewing of this film. Many of the members of the cast will be present, including, Kit Gruelle. Details below. Please join us. 

 SUNDAY DECEMBER 7th

Featured Film: Private Violence

With Special Guest: Kit Gruelle

Stateside Theatre at the Paramount, 719 Congress Avenue

VIP Reception, 1:00-2:00 p.m., Theatre lobby

Film, 2:30 p.m.

Q & A, 4:00-4:45 p.m.

 

Photos: Private Violence 

October Surprise for Domestic Violence Offenders

10_08_2014Domestic-Violence-AwarenessIn 1981, the month of October was dedicated to Domestic Violence Awareness.

Law enforcement agencies and victim advocacy groups are demanding greater domestic violence offender accountability. In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness month, programs around the country are stepping up offender-based campaigns.

The U.S. Marshals Lone Star Fugitive Task Force of Texas is increasing efforts this October to track down offenders who have warrants out for their arrest but evade local police.

In New Jersey, Assemblyman Troy Singleton is reintroducing a bill that allows law enforcement to track offenders through GPS technology. The bill was recently vetoed by Governor Chris Christie, but Singleton is confident the technology works and questions the veto.

“What really concerned me the most was… saying that victims somehow use GPS monitoring of their offender and their abusers to be a retaliatory action.                         – Assemblyman Troy Singleton (source: NJTV News).

Victims advocacy group, The National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women (NTF), released information on two bills that seek to expand existing firearms laws to cover offenders who are in dating relationships. The existing law does not protect unmarried women who experience dating violence or stalking. The web campaign to gain support for the new bills urges citizens to contact their local representatives to raise awareness and demand change.